Mental health: needs of gang-affiliated young people

Public Health England, 27 January 2015

This briefing aims to understand and address the mental health needs of gang-affiliated young people, and outlines the:

  • extent of mental illness in gang members
  • relationships between gang-affiliation and poor mental health
  • shared risk factors that contribute to both

It also emphasises the need for a life course approach to prevention that:

  • addresses risk factors
  • promotes resilience in young people
  • provides appropriate support for vulnerable young people

The briefing summarises evidence of the types of interventions that can:

  • protect children from antisocial behaviour and poor mental health
  • treat mental illness in vulnerable young people

Click here to download the briefing.

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Right here : how to promote youth-friendly mental health and wellbeing services

Mental Health Foundation, January 2015

This guide is aimed at those delivering mental health and wellbeing services for young people aged 16–25, based on the learning and experience from Right Here, a pioneering five-year programme between the Mental Health Foundation and the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.  It has been written to help services address the specific needs of this age group and tackle some of the barriers which prevent them from accessing traditional mental health services.

Click here to view the full text document.

Improving young people’s health and wellbeing: a framework for public health

Public Health England, 29 January 2015

This Framework has been developed as a resource to enable local areas in the delivery of their public health role for young people. It poses questions for councillors, health and wellbeing boards, commissioners, providers and education and learning settings to help them support young people to be healthy and to improve outcomes for young people.

Click here for further information and to download the document.

Screening for psychological and mental health difficulties in young people who offend: A systematic review and decision model

National Institute for Health Research, January 2015

Young people who have offended are more likely than people who have not offended to have mental health problems and they are also more likely to offend again. It may, therefore, be important to identify the mental health difficulties in this group and give them help for these problems.
There are, however, a number of unanswered questions about identifying mental health problems in young people who offend. These include:

  • How accurate are the different ways of identifying these difficulties?
  • If a difficulty is identified, how well does any treatment given for this difficulty work?
  • Does identifying mental health problems in this way represent good value for money?

The paper seeks to identify all research that could help to answer these questions. A small number of studies were identified that looked at how accurate different tools were at identifying mental health problems in this group. Most tools had limited accuracy. A small number of studies were also identified that had looked at whether or not treatments work for mental health difficulties in young people who offend. Although there was some encouraging evidence, it remains uncertain if treatments are effective in this group. In general, the search identified few studies and those studies that were identified were often of low quality.

Click here to download the full paper.

E-learning course launched on caring for gender nonconforming people

Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, January 2015

Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust have created an e-learning course to help healthcare and other staff understand the needs of gender nonconforming young people.

The course is free, is easily accessible online and takes around 45 minutes to complete. It is designed for healthcare staff of all levels and disciplines (not just those working in mental health), as well as support staff and those from the private healthcare sector. It is also suitable for people working in education. It provides an optional test, as well as a certificate of completion that enables users to earn CPD points. 

Click here for further information and to access the course.

How to commission better mental health and wellbeing services for young people

Mental Health Foundation, October 2014

is guide is aimed at those with a responsibility for commissioning mental health and wellbeing services for young people. Although the Right Here programme focused primarily on early intervention in community settings, many of the lessons we learnt – that are included in this guide – apply equally to the commissioning of services for more severe conditions.

Click here for further information and to download the guide.

New NICE Evidence Update on headaches

NICE, October 2014

NICE have published a new Evidence Update on ‘Headaches: Diagnosis and management of headaches in young people and adults’.

NICE Evidence Updates help to reduce the need for individuals, managers and commissioners to search for new evidence and keep health and social care professionals up-to-date with new research. While Evidence Updates do not replace current accredited guidance and do not provide formal recommendations, they do highlight new evidence that health and social care professionals may wish to consider alongside current guidance.

The new Evidence Update focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE guideline CG150 ‘Headaches: Diagnosis and management of headaches in young people and adults’ 2012.

Click here to view the evidence update.